ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 89-98

PTERYGIUM: Recent trends and perspectives—A review of pathogenesis and current management options


1 Lecturer Ebonyi State University Abakaliki Ebonyi State, Consultant Ophthalmologist/Glaucoma specialist, Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria
2 Senior Lecturer Ebonyi State University Abakaliki Ebonyi State, Consultant Ophthalmologist/Glaucoma specialist, Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria
3 Lecturer Ebonyi State University Abakaliki Ebonyi State, Consultant Ophthalmologist/Paediatric Ophthalmologist, Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Helen A Ginger-Eke
Lecturer Ebonyi State University Abakaliki Ebonyi State, Consultant Ophthalmologist/Glaucoma specialist, Department of Ophthalmology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njo.njo_5_18

Rights and Permissions

Objectives: (1) To review literature on the current understanding of the nature and pathogenesis of pterygium. (2) To highlight the recent advances in the treatment of pterygium. Materials and Methods: Relevant subheadings were entered into PubMed search engine and 165 articles addressing our objectives were retrieved and reviewed. Results: Pterygium may be proliferative rather than degenerative in nature. There is a strong correlation with ultraviolet radiation. Genetic alterations occur, such as point mutations of proto-oncogenesis such as Kirsten-Ras and alterations in the expression of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) (p53 or p63), alteration of matrix metalloproteinase in limbal and corneal tissues, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) genetically mediated expression of various cytokines, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. Oxidative stress may play a role, evidenced by the expression of certain proteins in pterygium tissues presumed to have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. High prevalence of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in pterygium tissue samples suggests a possible role for HPV. Several techniques of surgery have evolved over time including the modified bare-sclera techniques, sliding, “merest sclera,” adjunctive therapies with mitomycin C, 5-fluorouracil, corticosteroids, conjunctival autograft, limbal autograft, amniotic membrane graft, use of fibrin glue, and subconjuctival injection of bevacizumab. Conclusion: Advances in the understanding of pterygium have led to emerging treatment options that may not only reduce recurrent rates, but may also enable the use of less invasive treatment methods. Recommendation: Ophthalmologists working in hot climates should update their knowledge on the current concepts in the pathogenesis and management of pterygium to obtain better results.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed10264    
    Printed245    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded1209    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal